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Eyck Freymann

Columnist

eyck.freymann@gmail.com

Eyck Freymann is a contributing writer and a columnist for The Wire. A joint postdoctoral research fellow at the Harvard Belfer Center Arctic Initiative and the Columbia–Harvard China & The World Program, he is the author of One Belt One Road: Chinese Power Meets the World (November 2020). He was previously research assistant to Graham Allison at the Harvard…

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Eyck Freymann is a contributing writer and a columnist for The Wire. A joint postdoctoral research fellow at the Harvard Belfer Center Arctic Initiative and the Columbia–Harvard China & The World Program, he is the author of One Belt One Road: Chinese Power Meets the World (November 2020). He was previously research assistant to Graham Allison at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center; to Niall Ferguson at the Hoover Institution, Stanford; and Shi Zhiqin, dean of the Department of International Relations at Tsinghua University.

He holds an MPhil from the University of Cambridge, where he was a Henry Scholar; an AM in Asian Studies from Harvard University, where he won the Joseph Fletcher Memorial Prize for the top master’s thesis; and an AB in East Asian History with highest honors, also from Harvard. He is fluent in Chinese (Mandarin) and Spanish.

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Articles

Pole Position

In public, Chinese diplomats and climate negotiators deny that they see any link between climate change and geopolitics. But there is a deeply cynical consensus within China’s academic and policy communities that climate change creates geopolitical opportunities that China can exploit — and must exploit...

The Adaptation Advantage

China is mobilizing to adapt and thrive in a rapidly warming world. Under Xi Jinping, the country has undertaken thousands of projects — across industries and in every part of the country — that are clearly designed to protect the country against extreme climate impacts....

The Diplomatic Deadlock

For decades, climate change has been framed as a crisis that the international community needs to solve — and which it could solve if world leaders would only muster the political will to cooperate and share the burden. But the bonhomie of climate conferences and...

The Sponge Revolution

By 2030, 70 percent of Chinese cities are scheduled to become “sponge cities” — a novel solution designed to prevent flooding while also “greening” China and making it more resilient to climate change. If it succeeds, it will be a major step forward in the...